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Passover 2024 | 

פסח 5784 

Hag Pesah Sameah!

חג פסח שמח

Passover is a holiday of hope, renewal, and life. Nature’s spring is the backdrop for our people’s Exodus story of beginnings and freedom. Passover’s message and mood encourage and inspire us. As spring begins, Passover reminds us we are keepers of a vision, advocates for redemption. Celebrating Pesah, by gathering with family and friends around our Seder tables and joining in community, we attach our personal lives and concerns to the grand and potent moral principles for which God brought our ancestors out of Egypt as we retell and remember the Jewish people’s master story. 

Pesah Services Schedule

FIRST DAY OF PASSOVER in person & online

Tuesday April 23

9:30 AM

Festival Morning Service in the Stone Family Sanctuary

SECOND DAY OF PASSOVER "SEDER SERVICE"  in person only

Wednesday April 24 

9:30 AM

Join us IN PERSON ONLY in the Stone Family Sanctuary as we sit around tables to share in a “Seder Service” during which we’ll intersperse insights, teaching, and brief discussions into our recitation and festival prayer.

SHABBAT HOL HaMOED PESAH in person or online

Friday April 26 - 6:15 PM

Shabbat April 27 - 9:30 AM

SEVENTH DAY OF PASSOVER"SEDER SERVICE"  in person only

Monday April 29

9:30 AM

Join us IN PERSON ONLY in the Stone Family Sanctuary as we sit around tables to share in a “Seder Service” during which we’ll intersperse insights, teaching, and brief discussions into our recitation and festival prayer.

EIGHTH DAY OF PASSOVER in person or online

Tuesday April 30, 9:30 AM

Yizkor Memorial Prayers will be recited. 

Join us for Kiddush Lunch following our service.

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A Pesah Message
from Rabbi Ron Shulman

Dear Friends,

 

How different it will be when we sit down at our seder tables this year.

 

Jews are held hostage by Hamas terrorists. Millions in Israel and Gaza suffer the plagues of war. Israelis feel insecure, thousands are displaced, and all are hurting, angry, and exhausted. In a completely different context, we American Jews hold similar feelings.

 

On my recent trip to Israel, however, I met people of hope with resilient spirits and a resolve to renew....

Be a Hesed Haver and help us grow our Beth El community of lovingkindness.! Hesed Haverim help congregants by visiting those who are ill or homebound, making Shiva calls, attending a Minyan, sending a card, preparing a meal and so much more.  Whatever your talents, we always need more help.

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Haggadah Hineni

Haggadah Hineni is a personal participation Passover Haggadah. Use this Haggadah, written and compiled by Rabbi Ron Shulman, as a resource to guide your Seder guests to enjoy a "talking Seder" in which you and they tell the story and message of Passover through active discussion and engagement.

Haggadah Hineni

Be a Hesed Haver and help us grow our Beth El community of lovingkindness.! Hesed Haverim help congregants by visiting those who are ill or homebound, making Shiva calls, attending a Minyan, sending a card, preparing a meal and so much more.  Whatever your talents, we always need more help.

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Sell my

Hametz!

Hametz may be sold by completing this form until Monday morning April 22, 2024. Hametz that is sold reverts to your ownership when Pesah is concluded on Tuesday evening,  April 30, 2024.

 

It is a time-honored tradition to help the less fortunate purchase goods for their own Passover observance. At Congregation Beth El, we collaborate with Jewish Family Service to provide Passover foods to homebound seniors and families in need. Please consider making a financial contribution. As well, we support Mazon: A Jewish Response to Hunger at this holiday season.

Sell my Hametz

Be a Hesed Haver and help us grow our Beth El community of lovingkindness.! Hesed Haverim help congregants by visiting those who are ill or homebound, making Shiva calls, attending a Minyan, sending a card, preparing a meal and so much more.  Whatever your talents, we always need more help.

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Your practical how-to-guide for observing Pesah. Updated for 2024, published by the Conservative Movement's Rabbinical Assembly.  

Rabbinical Assembly

Passover Guide

Rabbinical Assembly Passover Guide

The Meaning of
Food on Passover

Passover is a season of hope, renewal, and life. Nature’s spring is the backdrop for our People’s story of beginnings and freedom. Passover’s message and mood lift us up and encourage us to look ahead to better days and brighter times.

As we get ready for our holiday, we pause to consider the meanings of freedom and human dignity we celebrate during the days of Passover. Anticipating Pesah, we are optimistic. In the course of time we may feel differently, but before our festival we look forward. As spring begins, we need Passover’s reminder. We are keepers of the vision, advocates for redemption.

Celebrating Pesah by gathering with family and friends around our Seder Tables, we attach our personal lives and concerns to the grand and potent moral principles for which God brought our ancestors out of Egypt.

On Passover the food we eat teaches us to pay proper attention to each and every person we meet. Matzah symbolizes freedom and human dignity. Matzah represents goodness and truth. It is made of any grain that can ferment or become Hametz: wheat, rye, oats, barley, or spelt. On Passover, Hametz, fermented grains and foods, suggests human arrogance and injustice. Of course, grain is not honest or unjust, good or bad. We are. That’s why limiting ourselves to the pure, unleavened grains of Matzah we eat on Passover reminds us to live for and to do good, to open ourselves to others, to form relationships and honor every person.

The freedom and equality we seek for all people requires humility, not arrogance. We wish not to live as people serving our own wills. Fermented grain implies personal and social excess. Unleavened bread suggests modesty. Passover teaches us that human arrogance is held in check by awareness of existence beyond ourselves. The change we make from Hametz to Matzah symbolizes that our efforts in life are in service of God and the values of God’s presence in our world.

Matzah was there from the beginning to the end. It was not only the dough which our ancestors did not have the time to let rise as they left Egypt, but the bread of affliction which they ate as slaves. Matzah, the bread of slaves, became the sustenance of a free people.

On Passover we turn our basic need for food and nourishment into the symbolic agent through which we express our faith and personal values. Just as all Matzah is potentially Hametz, so are we descendants of unpretentious slaves potentially the hardened and conceited of heart and mind. One week each year we return to the core ideals and basic visions of the goodness, honesty, and dignity our lives should reflect.

The physical process of cleaning, preparing, and changing our homes and kitchens is intended to inform our spiritual identities. Ritual and tradition without ethics is also ritual and tradition without deeper meaning.

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